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Load Bearing Wall Removal

You may want to remove a bearing wall... or at least, you think that it's bearing wall. Do not assume that just because the joists above the wall are continuous across the top of the wall, that the wall is not "load bearing". Remember, even if the floor above does not fall down after you remove the wall, you may be creating a potentially unsafe and dangerous condition. 

We can usually determine whether to not a wall is load bearing by carrying out an on-site review. In most cases, we can make safe assumptions without having you contractor cut any holes in the roof; however, these assumptions need to be verified by the contractor during construction. 

Most jobs like this involve a site visit. Design costs for these types of projects vary depending upon the number of beams required and the complexity involved in transferring loads from the end of new beams down to the foundations below. For interior changes to a modest size home, full permit plans often cost around $2,900.00, building permit fees not included.


Do I Need A Permit?

Yes, any structural change to a house requires a building permit, even though our on-site report may identify the size and type of beam that you may need for support once the wall is removed, you still need to get building permits. This is required by law under the Building Code Act. A site report cannot be used as a substitute for a building permit and design drawings. It's also important to remember that, when you sell your home, the purchaser may want to verify that you did your renovation work with a building permit. 

We can usually determine whether or not a wall is load-bearing by carrying out an on-site review. Sometimes, we may need to cut a small hole into the ceiling so that the size and direction of floor framing can be identified. We often find that older homes were constructed with continuous joists across the width of the house, yet the floor joist relies upon the extra support that it gets from the wall and supporting floor joists below. Remember, even if the floor above does not fall down after you remove a wall, you may be creating an over-spanned floor condition which is potentially unsafe! In some circumstances, we can make conservative (safe) assumptions without having your Contractor cut any holes, however these assumptions need to be verified by the Contractor during construction. 

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